Black Belt Set Sparring

Three step and two step sparring are described in the P.U.M.A. handbooks but one step isn’t, as it more free-form than three or two step. The following notes show what is expected of students at various grades.

For all one step sparring, the attacker should judge the distance by eye. The attacker needs to ensure they are close enough for the attack to actually work!

Traditional One Step

Traditional one step sparring has defined attacks; these are shown below.

1st and 2nd Kup

The attacks are as follows:

  1. Middle section punch in walking stance
  2. High section punch in walking stance
  3. Middle section reverse punch in L-stance
  4. Middle section knife-hand strike in L-stance
  5. High section punch in walking stance
  6. Middle section reverse punch in L-stance

Defence: Use blocks from patterns; body shifting/dodging is allowed.
Counter: Any counter attack; student should finish in a traditional stance.

1st Degree

The attacks are as follows:

  1. Middle section reverse punch in L-stance
  2. Middle section knife-hand strike in L-stance
  3. Jumping back-fist side-strike in X-stance
  4. Mid-air strike landing in L-stance
  5. Middle section obverse punch in L-stance

Defence: Use appropriate blocks from patterns; body shifting and dodging is allowed.
Counter: Any counter attack; students should finish in L-stance.

2nd Degree

The attacks are as follows (kicking from the back leg):

  1. Front snap kick
  2. Side piercing kick
  3. Turning kick
  4. Back piercing kick
  5. Reverse turning kick

Defence: Any appropriate block; body shifting/dodging is allowed.
Counter: Any counter attack; students should finish in L-stance.

Freestyle One Step

1st and 2nd Kup

Attack: Middle punch in walking stance.
Defence: Any block or counter; locks or restraints may also be used.

1st Degree

Attack: Any grab or hold (Middle punch in walking stance).
Defence: Any block or counter; locks, restraints or take-downs may be used.

2nd Degree

Attacks: Any grab or hold.
Defence: Any block or counter; locks, restraints or take-downs may be used.

Sunflowers Planted

My dad has challenged all his kids and grand-kids to grow the tallest sunflower. We had started some off inside, but they didn’t make it. So, this afternoon, we planted some in the back garden.

Hopefully, we haven’t left it so late that they won’t have a chance to grow!

We also planted lots of other things: spring onions, carrots, peas, tomatoes, peppers, chillies and cucumbers. We weren’t very successful with spring onions or peppers last year, so it would be great if they grow this year.

Rules of tackling

At Johnathon’s tag rugby session this morning, the coach introduced a bit of contact tackling (some of the players will be playing in the next age group up next season, so need to know about this sort of thing).

The coach gave the players three rules of tackling:

  • Eyes on thighs
  • Cheek to cheek
  • Ring of steel

Eyes on thighs

Keep your eyes on your opponents thighs. If he is going to change direction, you’ll see it in his thighs first.

Cheek to cheek

In the tackle, get your face cheek against his butt cheek. This will mean your head is behind his body, so won’t get squashed when he falls to the ground.

Ring of steel

Wrap your arms tightly around your opponent’s waist. This will help stop their movement and bring them down.

Two step sparring

Here are some points about two step sparring that I picked up at today’s session.

  • For the second “set”, where the counter attack is a sliding side elbow strike, it is down to the student to decide if they should step across before sliding. It depends on what position the attacker has ended: is a step actually needed or not?
  • For the third set, where the counter attack is a knee strike, the defender should grab the attacker behind the head. In class, however, students should grab their opponent on the shoulders instead. This reduces the chance of injuring someone’s neck! At a grading, the grasp should be behind the neck to show that you understand the technique.
  • For the forth set, where the counter attack is a front snap kick followed by a twin upset punch, the defender must decide which leg to kick with based on how far away the attacker is. If the attacker is close, kick from the front leg; if they are further away, kick from the back leg.

Of course, you should always remember to follow what your instructor tells you. The tips here are merely what my instructor has told me.

No Bowel Cancer!

Today I had a colonoscopy, because of a family history of bowel cancer. The procedure didn’t find any polyps or other indicators of bowel cancer, which is excellent news!

One less thing to worry about!